SUBMISSION AND GUIDELINES

Submission

Papers published in the IABPAD refereed journals are based on a double-blind peer-review process. Articles will be checked for originality using “Unicheck” plagiarism detection service. (https://unicheck.com/).

To submit a paper for journal publication, email it as an attachment to the Editor at: iabpad.journals@suddenlinkmail.com

Acceptance of a paper for publication is based on the recommendations of two anonymous reviewers. Author(s) of an accepted paper will be required to sign a copyright agreement.

If a paper is accepted for publication, the corresponding author will pay a processing fee of $25 and a handling fee of $15 per page. The corresponding author will receive a free copy of the journal. Each additional copy is $25.

The IABPAD Journals have been issued ISSN numbers by the Library of Congress. Articles published in the IABPAD journals are included in the world wide databases of EBSCO publishing Inc. and Gale Cengage Learning.

JOURNAL GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS

Manuscript Submission and Length:

Final version of a paper for the journal should be between 10 and 30 pages in length, single-spaced. Initial and final submission of papers is electronically to: iabpad.journals@suddenlinkmail.com By submitting a paper, the submitting author is certifying that the work is original, is not being considered for publication elsewhere, has not been accepted for publication or previously published, and is not copyrighted.

First Page:

The title of all papers should be centered, not to exceed three lines, and typed in caps on the first page, and without acronyms. The title should be 16-point font, Times New Roman. The authors’ names followed by affiliations of authors should be centered, single-spaced, and typed at the beginning of the second line below the title. Use 12-point font.

Abstract:

The abstract heading should appear two line spaces below the authors’ names and affiliations, centered, capitalized, and italicized in 12-point font. The abstract text for a paper should appear one-line apace below the abstract heading, indented 0.5 from the left and right martins. It should be italicized in a 10-point font, Times New Roman, and should not exceed 200 words.

Paper Typing:

  • All papers must be typed in Microsoft Word using Times New Roman and a 12-point font.
  • All papers must be typed, single-spaced, on regular 8.5”x11” paper, and fully justified.
  • Margins should be set to 1-inch top, bottom, left, and right.
  • Page number should be centered at the bottom of each page.
  • No headers and footers.
  • Use italics in place of underlines.
  • Indent all paragraphs ½ inch and do not skip lines between paragraphs.
  • All major headings should be bold, centered, capitalized, set to 12-point font, and with one space around heading.
  • All sub-headings should be bold, left justified with an initial capital for each word (Title case), set to 12-point font. Leave one line space above and below each sub-heading.
  • About the author(s), a short biography (not to exceed 7 lines) for each author should be placed at the end of the reference.
  • Appendices should be placed at the end of the manuscript.

Tables and Figures:

All tables and figures should be typed in Microsoft Word and incorporated into the body of the text within the margins. They should be placed as close as possible to the location in the text where they are first cited. For each table or figure, center the word “Table” or “Figure” with a number (e.g., 1, 2, etc.) above the table or figure. The identification labels (the titles) of tables and figures) should be above “Table” or “Figure”, centered, typed in initial cap for each word (Title case). Each table or figure and their identification labels (titles) should be bold.

Math and Equations:

Use words in regular text, not math. For example, “we surveyed one-hundred (100) managers instead of “we surveyed 100 managers”. Use the word “chi-square” to evaluate coefficients. Do not use “X 2 ”. Authors can report statistical results using symbols in parentheses. Authors should also display and number the used equations only. Equation numbers should be between parentheses and flushed with the right margin.

Footnotes and End notes:

Do not use any footnotes or endnotes.

Reference Format in the List of References:

  • References should be placed at the end of the manuscript and should include only those actually cited in the text.
  • All lines after the first line of each entry in your reference list should be indented one-half inch from the left margin.
  • The style guidelines for references must follow the publications manual of the American Psychological Association (APA). Titles of journals or books will be italicized instead of underlined. There should be no blank lines between consecutive references. Below are examples.

Journal Articles:

Single Author

Finkelstein, S. (1992). Power in top management teams: Dimensions, measurement, and validation. Academy of Management Journal, 3, 505-538.

Two Authors

Feldman, M.S., & March, J.G. (1981). Information in organizations as a signal and symbol. Administrative Science Quarterly, 26 (5), 171-186.

Three Authors

Kernis, M.H., Cornell, D. P., & Sun, C.R., (1993). There’s more to self-esteem than whether it is high or low: The importance of stability of self-esteem. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 65, 1190-1204.

Four or More Authors

Kernis, M.H., Cornell, D. P., Sun, C.R., Berry, A.,& Harlow, T., (1993). There’s more to selfesteem than whether it is high or low: The importance of stability of self-esteem. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 65, 1190-1204.

Note: If the above reference (four and more authors) is in the text of the manuscript, it will be:

Kernis, M.H. et al, (1993). There’s more to self-esteem than whether it is high or low: The importance of stability of self-esteem. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 65, 1190-1204.

Book:

Cyert, R.M., & March, J.G. (1963). A behavior theory of the firm. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prince-Hall.

Chapter in Book:

Bayoumi, T., & Barry, E. (1997). Is regionalism simply a diversion? Evidence from the evaluations of the EC and EFTA. In T. Ito (Ed.), Regionalism versus multilateral trade arrangement (pp. 239-249). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.

Editors for A Book:

Letheridge, S., & Cannon, C.R. (Eds.). (1980). Bilingual education: Teaching English as a second language, New York: Praeger.

Internet Articles or Abstracts Based on a Print Source:

Smith, R . (1998). TQM in Australian manufacturing business [Electronic version]/Quality Journal, 5, 117-123.

Articles or Abstracts in an Internet-only Journal:

Frederickson, B.L. (2000, March 7). Cultivating positive emotions to optimize health and well-being. Prevention & Treatment, 3, Article (or Abstract) 0001a. Retrieved November 20, 2000 from http://www.preventiontreatment.com/Frederickson.html.

Report from an Organization on Its Web Site:

Canarie, Inc. (1997, September 27 or n.d. if no date is available). Towards a Canadian health IWAY: Vision, opportunities and future steps. Retrieved November 8, 2000, from http://www.canada.org/iway.html.

APA Citation Guide

In order to access the APA citation guide, please visit this link: http://www.bibme.org/citation-guide/apa

SUGGESTED RESEARCH DESIGN FOR EMPIRICAL STUDIES

Title:

The title of a research paper (manuscript) should reflect and cover the contents of the study and should NOT exceed two to three lines. Titles of research papers should be specific, clear, and concise. Avoid using broad and general titles and avoid using acronyms in the title.

Abstract:

The abstract of a research paper should be a brief description of the study objective(s), Report its results or findings briefly, and do NOT exceed 200 words. Avoid mentioning parts of the research methods such as research instruments (survey questionnaire) sample and data collection, utilized statistical techniques, etc. Also avoid the use of acronyms in abstracts.

Introduction:

The introduction should not be very short or very long (at least 4-6 paragraphs). This introduction should be documented by relevant references from recent studies, unless it is completely the product of the author’s ideas. At the end of the introduction, briefly describe the study as it was mentioned in the abstract, but without the results of the study. Spell out all acronyms first, subsequently, use the developed acronyms from now on after their initial creation.

Literature Review:

This section should include previous and recent studies that are relevant to the study. Sometimes, authors use the title “Background of This Study” instead of the title “literature review,” or use several subtitles under a main title. However, it depends on the type of the study and its contents.

Hypotheses:

Hypotheses or research questions may be formulated under a separate section Titled “Hypotheses.” Sometimes hypotheses may be formulated under sections of the literature review. The location of hypotheses depends on the contents of the study.

Methods, Research Methods, or Methodology:

Research methods may include survey questionnaires or other instruments (e.g., interviews, observation, etc.), sample, data collection, measurements of variable(s), statistical techniques, etc. A brief description should be after each of these items or concepts.

Survey Questionnaire:

Some authors utilize survey questionnaires (instruments) to collect “primary data”. Authors should describe the utilized survey questionnaires in details. For example, how was the utilized survey developed? Was the survey adapted from valid and reliable studies? Was the survey questionnaire developed by the authors? If the utilized survey questionnaire is new, how were its validity and reliability tested? The survey questionnaire should be put in an appendix with the first submission for reviewers. Some studies require their authors to collect secondary data (archival data). Other studies require both primary and secondary data.

Sample(s):

Authors should describe the research sample and how it was selected. Is it a convenient sample? If it is, authors should justify the choice of the sample. Is it a random, representative, or stratified sample? Authors should clarify the type of the selected sample.

Data Collection:

Authors should describe the process of data collection. For example, if authors have collected the primary data; how were this data collected? If authors have collected secondary data, authors should describe the source or sources of this data. Some authors use one title for “Sample and Data Collection”.

Measurement of Variables:

Authors should identify the measurements of all variables (independent, dependent, and control variables) included in their studies. Authors should justify the choice and use of control variables, if any.

Statistical Techniques:

Authors use certain statistical techniques (e.g., SPSS, SAS, AMOS, LISERL, Etc.) to analyze their data (e.g., means, frequencies, percentages, correlation matrices, ANOVA, MANOVA, regression analysis, factor analysis, time series, structural modeling or path analysis, etc.).

Results or Findings of Study:

Authors start with the description of their data analysis. For example, some studies require their authors to put the results or the findings of their studies into tables titled: descriptive statistics, correlation matrices, regression results, factor analysis, etc.

Limitation(s) of This Study:

Some studies require their authors to have a brief statement about the limitation(s) that face their studies.

Implications:

In this section, authors describe what their studies imply. That is, what others should learn from their studies.

Recommendation(s) for Future Research:

In this section, authors suggest certain recommendations for future research.

Conclusion:

Authors should draw brief conclusions for the results of their studies. Sometimes authors use “Concluding Remarks” when their studies require long conclusions.

Acknowledgement:

Acknowledgement is a brief statement that appears after the text of the manuscript and before the list of references. It may refer to academic or financial contributions received by authors from certain individuals, institutions, or organizations. Not every study must have an acknowledgement.

References:

  • All references in the text of the manuscript MUST be listed under the list of references.
  • Delete all references that are NOT in both the text of the manuscript and the list of references.
  • The names of authors and the years must be same in the text of the manuscript and in the list of references.

NOTE: Avoid the use of the first pronouns (I, we, us, me, my. our, ours) unless it is imperative.

SUGGESTED RESEARCH DESIGN FOR THEORETICAL STUDIES

Title:

The title of a research paper (manuscript) should reflect and cover the contents of the study and should NOT exceed two to three lines. Title of a research paper should be specific, clear, and concise. Avoid using broad and general titles and avoid using acronyms in the title.

Abstract:

The abstract of the study should briefly describe the study and report the research items included in the study. The abstract should be short, clear, and should NOT exceed 200 words. Avoid the use of acronyms in the abstract.

Introduction:

The introduction should not be very short or very long (at least 3-5 paragraphs). The introduction should be documented with current and relevant references, unless it is completely the product of the author’s ideas. At the end of the introduction, authors should also include a brief description of the study as it was described in the abstract. Start using the developed acronyms (if any) from now on.

Literature Review:

This section should include previous and recent studies that are relevant to the current study. Sometimes, authors use the title “Background of This Study” instead of the title “literature review,” or use several subtitles under a main title or main titles. However, it depends on the type of the study and its contents.

Objective(s) of Study:

Every study has an objective or objectives. This section includes the same objectives mentioned simultaneously in the abstract and at the end of the introduction. In certain studies, some researchers formulate hypotheses for future research under this section or under the section of “literature Review.” However, this depends on the type of study and its contents. Implication: Authors describe what their studies imply. This is, what other readers can learn from their studies.

Conclusions:

Authors present concluding remarks that briefly summarize their results.

Recommendations for Future Research:

Authors may suggest certain recommendations for future researchers.

Acknowledgement:

Acknowledgement is a brief statement that appears after the text of the research paper and before the list of references. It may refer to academic or financial contributions received by authors from certain individuals, institutions, or organizations. Not every study must have an acknowledgement.

References:

  • All references in the text of the manuscript MUST be listed under the list of references.
  • Delete all references that are NOT in both the text of the manuscript and list of references.
  • The names of authors and the years must be same in the text of the manuscript and in the list of references.

NOTE: Avoid the use of the first pronouns (I, we, us, me, my. our, ours) unless it is imperative.